Event, Holiday Celebration, Paganism, Prayer

Equinox Thoughts

The Equinox is the Feast of the Vanir in our home practice, and while we celebrated with friends yesterday and hailed them at a blot, I would still like to share the original prayer I wrote, in the same format as other prayers I’ve shared recently. Feel free to use this at your own home celebration!

The Autumn Equinox has arrived,
And the nights are now as long as the days
The last of the fruits of the earth are ripening
And the harvest is well underway!

The days are still warm and the leaves still green
But the nights are beginning to cool
Here we are at the balance –
Mid Autumn Equinox, between the Midsummer and Midwinter Solstices!

And on this day, we honor Freyr and Freyja,
Beloved deities of Vanaheim, and all their kin
Come to us now, and join our celebration!
We offer you food, drink, and merriment!

We ask in return for your blessings,
Help us to harvest what we planted in the spring.

Freyr and Freyja, Hail and Welcome!

Original Prayer by Aleja Nic Bhe Chuille

It was a two hour drive northeast to the friend’s house, as we’ve both moved farther away from where we lived when we first met, and that distance is no easy feat with a toddler who hates car rides. Up was not too bad – down home was much worse as we were hours past his usual bed time. Still, the gathering of friends I have not seen in too long was much, much needed. And that got me to thinking about community, which came up as a theme in the blot.

I spent a long time as a solitary witchy pagan animist something, barely aware of a wider community, until I happened across an ADF Druid grove in Baltimore the last few weeks of 2012. Scott and I both found community there for a while, but the distance became too much as other parts of our life solidified and we stopped going in early 2016. That autumn we met the members of the Fellowship Beyond the Star for the first time at Pagan Pride festivals, and we attended some of their meetings as time allowed – though as I moved into my second and third trimesters we got out of the house less and less, and then for the first three months after the Acorn was born in May we did hardly anything at all but take care of the baby, eat, and sleep.

Still, when we emerged from that cocoon, we found the Fellowship community very welcoming, and we also started attending our local UU church, which soon had a fledgling pagan study group. We were putting down roots, finding community around us both physically locally and also in nearby pagan area groups. We still had friends in Baltimore, but that became more connected by social media and less by actual in-person meetings. That doesn’t make those connections seem less valid, though – they can provide plenty of different kinds of support, even though it’s a bit too far for a “whoops I need a ride to urgent care” call.

Now, both local pagan groups (The Fellowship Beyond the Star, and Fox & Fungi at UUCR) have grown some, and I find myself in organizational roles in both. I’ve begun teaching workshops in the local community, and even down in Atlanta this past July. Acquaintances met at community events are becoming friendships, and I begin to see how my small groups might join in networks with other groups to form woven communities, providing the support we all desperately need.

The Autumn Equinox, the middle of fall in my seasonal paradigm, is a time of harvest and in an agricultural community it would also be a time of the community coming together, pitching in to make sure everything was getting set for winter. It’s a time to check in with those local to you, but also with wider ideas of community in this technologically connected age. For my husband’s Jewish relatives and ancestors, it is also time for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, a time to mend bridges and reconnect. We try to continue some of those traditions in our home as well, so there will be apples and honey on my kitchen table soon. For many people this is also when the school year seems to finally be properly underway, with everything settled from the first whirlwind of Back-to-School.

In my work with the Fair Folk, this is also usually the time when the Wild Hunts and Fairy Rades begin. I’ve been learning that the acronychal rising of the Pleiades happens around the Equinox, and that feels significant, though I’m still not sure what exactly that means for my personal practice. I mentioned that this is the Feast of the Vanir for us, and while Freyr and Freyja are usually my focus, with Njord and Nerthus included as well, I also deliberately include the alfar of Vanaheim, whom I believe to be culturally distinct from the beings of either Alfheim/Ljossalfheim or Nidavellir/Svartalfheim. I try to spend a bit of time around this day with my allies there, checking in and just enjoying their company. So far I haven’t attempted to join their seasonal celebrations, but perhaps this year I will ask. Perhaps they can help bring me clarity about the timing of the Pleiades and the Hunts.

Autumn is underway. Communities are pulling together. And Samhain will come faster than we expect.

Devotional Jewelry, Etsy Shop Update

Vanir Devotional Bracelets!

We made these for NoVA Pagan Pride Day in September, but I hadn’t gotten around to blogging about them or uploading them to the shop until now!  October was a crazy month, ya’ll, and now I’m playing catch-up.

vanir bracelets.jpg
Clockwise from top left: bracelets for Freyr, Freyja, Nerthus, and Njord

 

Like most of our bracelets, these are made from a variety of stone beads, many of which are semi-precious, pearl knotted on durable nylon cording, with metal toggle clasps.  The Freyr bracelet is made with red tiger’s eye, chrysanthemum stone, and mahogany obsidian.  The one for Freyja has golden tiger’s eye, red agate, and rutilated quartz.  For Nerthus, we chose kambaba jasper, moss agate, and bronzeite.  The bracelet for Njord has larvikite, dumortierite, and sodalite.  The tiger’s eye, bronzeite, larvikite, and dumortierite all have flashes that are not readily caught in a photograph, and the greens in the kambaba jasper are much more brilliant in the sunlight.  Overall, though, the above images are a fair rendering of the stones used.  The findings are all gold-colored metal, and the difference in coloring here is not as pronounced in person; here it’s largely due to environmental reflections in the photographs.  Each bracelet also includes a single glass bead to ease the use of the toggle clasp.  These bracelets are approximately 8 inches long, and we can make them longer or shorter to better fit you, if requested.

All four are now available in the Etsy shop for $40 each, and we can make stretchy versions of them for the slightly cheaper price of $25 (due to the less intensive labor process and fewer materials), so do inquire if you’d prefer that style!

Also, since we’ve started to expand our devotional bracelets out to the Celtic and Germanic pantheons, who else do you want to see?  Let us know!